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Archaeocast 11: Diving on Protected Wrecks

Matt Astill emerging from his dive

Archaeocast joins our coastal and marine dive team on board the Wessex Explorer.
 
Divers Graham Scott, Matt Astill and Niall Callan explain the work that Wessex Archaeology do in support of the Protection of Wrecks Act (1973). During this dive they investigate the Norman’s Bay wreck and Matt describes it to us from below the waves.
 
This is the first archaeocast recorded by Time Travelling by Water, our marine and coastal outreach project, which is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.
 
Archaeocast 11 was recorded on location by Gemma Ingason. Editing and post-production were undertaken on dry land at Wessex Archaeology's headquarters in Salisbury, England, by Gemma Ingason and Tom Goskar.

Gemma Ingason interviews Graham Scott about his favourite shipwreck


20:09 minutes (18.46 MB)

Archaeocast 12: The wreck of the paddle steamer Iona

View from the boat while diving on the wreck of the Iona, ScotlandView from the boat while diving on the wreck of the Iona, ScotlandArchaeocast 12 joins our coastal and marine dive team in Scotland.
 
During this dive they investigate the wreck of the Iona, a paddle steamer with an interesting and somewhat unexpected history. Divers Graham Scott and Niall Callan explain the work that Wessex Archaeology undertook on this vessel on behalf of Historic Scotland, who we'd like to thank for their support of this recording.
 
This edition of archaeocast was recorded by Time Travelling by Water, our marine and coastal outreach project, which is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.
 
Archaeocast 12 was recorded on location by Graham Scott. Editing and post-production were undertaken on dry land at Wessex Archaeology's headquarters in Salisbury, England, by Gemma Ingason and Tom Goskar. 
 

13:26 minutes (12.33 MB)

Archaeocast 13: Coastal and Marine Geophysics on the North Sea

Surveyor Tina Michel aboard the Wessex ExplorerSurveyor Tina Michel aboard the Wessex ExplorerIn this edition of archaeocast we join our coastal and marine geophysical survey team on the North Sea.
 
Surveyor Tina Michel describes the work that Wessex Archaeology is doing as we investigate an important Palaeolithic site 8 miles east of Great Yarmouth in Norfolk. It was from this site, in aggregate licence area 240, that 75 handaxes were dredged and reported through the BMAPA/EH Protocol in February 2008, which has been described as the most significant find of Palaeolithic material ever to be retrieved from below the North Sea.
 
This edition of archaeocast was recorded by Time Travelling by Water on behalf of English Heritage, who are funding the project through the Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund.
 
Archaeocast 13 was recorded on location by Gemma Ingason. Editing and post-production were undertaken on dry land at Wessex Archaeology's headquarters in Salisbury, England, by Gemma Ingason and Tom Goskar.
 
View towards Lowestoft from the Wessex Explorer heading out to seaView towards Lowestoft from the Wessex Explorer heading out to sea
 
Visit the Area 240 website to find out more.
 

12:07 minutes (16.66 MB)

Archaeocast 14: Marine Geophysics in the North Sea (Area 240) Part Two

Image

In this edition of Archaeocast we catch up with our Coastal and Marine geophysical survey team as they continue to study the submerged prehistory of aggregate licence Area 240. In Archaeocast 13 we spoke to Tina Michel as she surveyed the layers of sand and sediment deep below the North Sea. We now hear the results of that survey and explore the next stages of this in-depth and exciting project.
 
This edition of Archaeocast was recorded by Time Travelling by Water on behalf of English Heritage, who are funding the project through the Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund.
 
Archaeocast 14 was recorded by Gemma Ingason. Editing and post-production were undertaken at Wessex Archaeology's headquarters in Salisbury, England, by Gemma Ingason and Tom Goskar.

Marine geophysical equipment


9:10 minutes (10.52 MB)

Archaeocast 15: The East Kent Access Road (Part One)

Archaeocast 15 is a special edition, recorded on behalf of Oxford-Wessex Archaeology, a joint venture between Oxford Archaeology and Wessex Archaeology.
 
A new road is to be built on the Isle of Thanet in east Kent during 2010-11. The road will be 6.5 km long and will cross one of the richest archaeological areas in Britain. Before construction begins archaeologists will excavate the whole length of the route. This will be the largest excavation in Britain in 2010, covering approximately 40 hectares.
 
Archaeocast takes you on a quick tour of the site, and talks to some of the people working on it, from the archaeologists doing the digging to those making sure everything stays on schedule so that the engineers can start on time.
Neolithic ring ditch
Neolithic ring ditch. View on Flickr.

9:46 minutes (8.96 MB)

Archaeocast 16: The East Kent Access Road (Part Two)

Archaeocast 16 is a special edition, recorded on behalf of Oxford-Wessex Archaeology, a joint venture between Oxford Archaeology and Wessex Archaeology.
 
In the second podcast in the series about the archaeology of the East Kent Access Road we visit the site during one of our July 2010 Open Days to find out about what has been found so far, speak with specialists about prehistoric flint tools and how we learn about past environments, find out what some of our volunteers have been up to, and go on a site tour of a late Iron Age village.

Site tour

About the East Kent Access Road

A new road is to be built on the Isle of Thanet in east Kent during 2010-11. The road will be 6.5 km long and will cross one of the richest archaeological areas in Britain. Before construction begins archaeologists will excavate the whole length of the route. This will be the largest excavation in Britain in 2010, covering approximately 40 hectares.
 
Visit the Archaeology of the East Kent Access Road project website to find out more.
 

21:03 minutes (19.28 MB)
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