Wreck 5010

Summary

Wreck site 5010 was located north-east of the Nab Tower in the deep draught vessel approach to the Nab Channel. The wreck lies in 13.6m deep water (CD) on a sandy seabed.
 
The site was discovered by the UKHO in 1969 and charted. It was described as a broken up wooden steamship. A boiler and a four-bladed propeller were found on site. Wessex Archaeology carried out geophysical surveys in 2002 and 2003 and a brief assessment dive in 2002. No further diving evaluations were undertaken on the wrecksite.
 
Boiler. Two holes are visible on top, these could be the remains of a pressure relief valve or steam valveBoiler. Two holes are visible on top, these could be the remains of a pressure relief valve or steam valve
 

Results

The evidence gathered from documentary sources and the Wessex Archaeology field assessment indicates that the wreck represents a steamship with single screw propulsion and scotch boiler. The ship might have been of composite build. These facts suggest a date of building after 1862, the year the scotch boiler was invented and patented.
 
To date no recorded losses corresponding to the archaeological evidence have been found.