Press Area

These photographs are for use of newspapers and magazines only and not for websites or other media. They may be used only once. If you are able to put a link to our website www.wessexarch.co.uk we would be grateful.
 
For use beyond that stated above, please contact Wessex Archaeology, on +44 (0)1722 326867 for permission
 
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One of the sections onboard the salvage barge Hookness.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
Bow section recovered onboard PLA salvage barge Hookness.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
Bow section of the Elizabethan wreck being brought onshore for recording.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
The bow section of the ship being recorded by total station by WA surveyors to create a CAD model which can be used to help better understand how vessel was constructed and how the five large pieces of the wreck fit together.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
The ships timbers are massive and moving them from the salvage barge onto the quayside for archaeological recording proves a tricky task.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
A side scan sonar image of the remains of the Princes Channel Wreck gathered in May 2004 before excavation and recovery began.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
The bow section being lifted on board the PLA's salvage barge Hookness.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
The bow section being lifted on board the PLA's salvage barge Hookness.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
Part of the side of the ship being lifted on board the PLA's salvage barge Hookness.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
Part of the side of the ship breaking the surface at the end of a long day of recovery operations.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
One of the most delicate items recovered from the wreck - part of a leather garment or jerkin.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
Surveyors from Wessex Archaeology undertaking the shore side recording of a section of the hull.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
One of Wessex Archaeology’s diving team preparing to start work underwater.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
The grasshopper motif associated with Sir Thomas Gresham on the barrel of the cannon.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
The maker’s mark of ‘T G’ or Thomas Gresham on the barrel of the cannon, revealed after the careful removal of the concretion.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
Small pewter candlestick, used onboard by crewmen.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.
Staff from Wessex Archaeology’s Finds section identifying a fragment of Spanish Olive jar widely used as a container for trade food stuffs by mariners in 16th-17th centuries.
 
© Wessex Archaeology Ltd 2004.