On 16th November, Wessex Archaeology Scotland joined community groups, other archaeological companies and Local Authority archaeological officers to present their findings at the annual Edinburgh, Lothians and Borders Archaeology Conference at Queen Margaret University.

The conference covered important archaeological discoveries within the last year of archaeological work in the south-east of Scotland, and gave us the chance to present our preliminary findings from the mitigation works completed on the onshore transmission works for the Neart na Gaoithe Offshore Wind Farm (for which Wessex Archaeology’s coastal & marine team are also the retained archaeologist for the offshore works).

The site at the onshore transmission works for the Neart na Gaoithe Offshore Wind Farm The site at the onshore transmission works for the Neart na Gaoithe Offshore Wind Farm

These works uncovered a possible trackway or routeway close to the edge of the Lammermuir Hills which was interpreted as a possible cursus, or ceremonial routeway. A pit alignment of 12 large pits with probable post holes within their bases was also present nearby, but sadly currently no dating evidence has been recovered from either artefacts or environmental sampling from these features.

A pit alignment of 12 large pits at Neart na Gaoithe Offshore Wind Farm onshore transmission works

The presentation gave us a chance to place these features within the wider landscape which has a number of similar features identified by cropmark interpretation from aerial photographs.

Additionally, it was very interesting to hear about another pit alignment recently excavated by CFA Archaeology at East Linton, which displayed some, if not all, of the same characteristics as the Neart na Gaoithe example. The conference was a day of excellent talks and a great chance to talk to groups about future collaborations exploring the archaeological record of south-east Scotland.

By Ben Saunders, Senior Marine Archaeologist