The medieval archaeology

Evidence of medieval activity survives on the site only in the form of large pitsEvidence of medieval activity survives on the site only in the form of large pitsFollowing the end of Roman rule in Britain, after about 410 AD, the city of London was largely abandoned. It was not reoccupied until the Late Saxon period, after about 900 AD. Again, the site lay in the heart of the medieval city.
 
The bodies of a pig, a cat, and a bird had been deliberately buried together.The bodies of a pig, a cat, and a bird had been deliberately buried together.However, archaeological remains relating to the medieval and later use of the site have been largely destroyed by development during the 19th and 20th centuries, when buildings with deep basements were built on the site. Evidence of medieval activity survives on the site only in the form of large pits of 13th or 14th century date, from which animal bones have been recovered; these pits were almost certainly used for tanning (the processing of hides).
 
An unusual medieval animal burial has been found. The bodies of a pig, a cat, and a bird had been deliberately buried together.
 
A number of post-medieval (16th to 19th century) cess pits, some lined with timber, have also been found.
 
Medieval LondonMedieval London