The Wreck

The wreck was first located in 1945 but she was not correctly identified as the Mendi until 1974. She lies in deep, murky, water and so has rarely been visited by divers. Those who have, say that she sits upright on the sea bed. Parts of the bow and stern are quite well preserved but she has broken apart in the middle and parts of the boilers and engine can be seen.
 
Photograph BASNC plate: Courtesy of David WendesPhotograph BASNC plate: Courtesy of David Wendes
 
Some small things can also be seen, such as some of the plates that the men would have eaten off. It was the crest of the British and African Steam Navigation Company on some of these plates that allowed divers to identify the wreck as the Mendi.
 
Photograph of parts of the engine: Courtesy of Keith RimesPhotograph of parts of the engine: Courtesy of Keith Rimes
 
There is a growing awareness that the Mendi can be treated as war grave but some pieces, such as porthole surrounds have been brought to the surface by divers as souvenirs or to sell. Some have been given to museums in Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, and on the Isle of Wight.
 
Photograph of a scuttle or porthole from the Mendi: Courtesy of Keith RimesPhotograph of a scuttle or porthole from the Mendi: Courtesy of Keith Rimes