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07-02-2019
Current Archaeology

Excavating the CA archive: cover photos from issues 101-200, part II


In last month’s column I highlighted some of my favourite covers from issues 101-200 (1986- 2005). Now I pick up where I left off, continuing my explorations of this era through the pages of Current Archaeology, and roving in time from the 3rd…
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07-02-2019
Current Archaeology

Underneath the abbey: Uncovering more than 1,000 years of religious life in Bath


Modern Bath Abbey overlies the site of what was one of the largest cathedrals in medieval England. Now its remains, together with traces of the Anglo-Saxon monastery that preceded it, have been brought to light once more. Kirsten Egging Dinwiddy, …
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07-02-2019
Current Archaeology

Marylebone cold case


Given the recent cold weather, the discovery of a massive underground ‘ice house’, unearthed next to Regent’s Park in London, seems rather fitting. Built in the late 18th century, the subterranean chamber escaped damage during the Blitz bombings…
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07-02-2019
Current Archaeology

Exploring the lives of London’s 19th-century poor


A cemetery excavated on the site of New Covent Garden Market in Nine Elms, near Battersea, is illuminating the lives of some of 19th-century London’s poorest inhabitants. The investigation, which uncovered nearly 100 burials, was carried out by…
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07-02-2019
Current Archaeology

Roman lead coffins recovered in Surrey


Two decorated Roman lead coffins have been uncovered during recent work at a quarry in Surrey. Only a few hundred burials involving such caskets are known from the whole of Britain, with these latest examples discovered by Wessex Archaeology during…
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07-02-2019
Current Archaeology

Cernunnos in Cambridgeshire


A figurine thought to be Britain’s only known example depicting the Celtic god Cernunnos has been found during the excavation of a late Iron Age/early Roman settlement in Cambridgeshire. The post Cernunnos in Cambridgeshire appeared first on Current…
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07-02-2019
Current Archaeology

The mystery of Leochel-Cushnie’s modern monument


When a strikingly well-preserved example of a Recumbent Stone Circle was identified in Aberdeenshire farmland (shown above), archaeologists were intrigued by its unusual design. After further investigation, however, the reason behind the Leochel-…
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07-02-2019
Current Archaeology

Science Notes – Identifying vitamin D deficiency in the Roman Empire


Several previous ‘Science Notes’ have featured osteological analysis tangentially (see CA 337, 338, 342, and 344), but we have not explored it in depth – until now. This month’s column considers the effects of vitamin D deficiency, how it can be…
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07-02-2019
Current Archaeology

Revisiting the Mote of Urr


Some 65 years after it concluded, the results of Brian Hope- Taylor’s excavation of the Mote of Urr – a motte-and-bailey castle near Dalbeattie in Dumfries and Galloway (shown above) – have finally been published. The post Revisiting the Mote of Urr…
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07-02-2019
Current Archaeology

Current Archaeology 348 – now on sale


This month finds us making our final preparations for our annual conference on 8-9 March – I look forward to meeting many of you there, and if you haven’t yet bought your ticket it’s not too late. For the latest details of CA Live! 2019, including…
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04-02-2019
Current Archaeology

Editor-in-Chief’s Dinner 2019: Spaghetti House


We would like to invite anyone attending Current Archaeology Live! 2019 to join us at a special Editor-in-Chief’s dinner after the conference on Friday 8th March.  The meal will take place directly after the evening reception, at the Goodge Street…
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22-01-2019
Current Archaeology

Review – ‘The River’s Tale’: archaeology on the Thames foreshore in Greater London


The River Thames must be one of the longest archaeological sites in Britain, both in terms of distance and duration. People have been collecting artefacts from the muddy foreshore or dredged from the river since the 19th century. More systematic…
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22-01-2019
Current Archaeology

Review – Footprints from the Past


Recent railway improvements entailed large-scale excavations in the outskirts of Alchester, a Claudian fortress evolving into Oxfordshire’s largest Roman town. Published at impressive speed, this splendid fieldwork monograph presents important new…
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22-01-2019
Current Archaeology

Review – Breaking the Surface: an art/archaeology of prehistoric architecture


This volume offers the reader a radical view of what prehistoric pits did and the various social layers that made them more than just part of a domestic or ritual structure. Using modern architectural ethics and construction concepts, Bailey goes…
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22-01-2019
Current Archaeology

Review – Blick Mead: exploring the ‘first place’ in the Stonehenge landscape


This is a well-rounded and readable account of research undertaken at Blick Mead, and one that undeniably establishes the site’s importance in adding to our understanding of the British Mesolithic, and of the wider Stonehenge landscape.…
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22-01-2019
Current Archaeology

Review – Clash of Cultures? The Romano-British period in the West Midlands


This volume has been 16 years in the making, its origins being found in a regional research framework seminar in 2002. While most of the contributions in the book were presented as papers at that seminar, they are by no means out of date, however,…
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22-01-2019
Current Archaeology

Review – Life and Death in the Countryside of Roman Britain


This is the third and final volume in the New Visions of the Countryside of Roman Britain series, whose geographical scope is England and Wales. The latest volume, like its companions, focuses on the people who lived in the countryside, probably…
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22-01-2019
Current Archaeology

Review – I am Ashurbanipal


When the Assyrian king Ashurbanipal took the throne in 669 BC, his empire was at its height. As well as defeating enemies in violent confl ict and hunting lions, Ashurbanipal saw himself as a scholar and amassed a vast royal library. A major…
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03-01-2019
Current Archaeology

CA 347 Competition – win a copy of ‘Drawing Somerset’s Past’ by Victor Ambrus


This month The History Press is offering a copy of Drawing Somerset’s Past by Victor Ambrus to five lucky competition winners. The History Press is the UK’s largest dedicated history publisher, publishing a broad range of topics and on periods,…
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03-01-2019
Current Archaeology

Excavating the CA archive: cover photos from issues 101-200, part I


In last month’s column, I picked some of my favourite covers from the first hundred issues of Current Archaeology, the years 1967-1986, a period that has come to be seen by some as a ‘golden age’ of rescue archaeology, and by others less happily as…
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