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06-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Excavating the CA archive: cover photos from the first 100 issues


In my column on the ‘great excavation’ of Shapwick (CA 345), I included one of my all-time favourite Current Archaeology cover photos, that of CA 151 (February 1997), where a then broken-legged Mick Aston (injured tripping over a holy well!) is…
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06-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Writing early medieval England: Tracing the first echoes of Anglo-Saxon voices


How did the kingdoms of early medieval England evolve into a single nation?A new exhibition at the British Library combines artefacts and manuscripts to tell the story of the Anglo-Saxons in their own words. Carly Hilts reports. The post Writing…
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06-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Rethinking Pictish symbols


Recent research on Pictish symbols has provided a new chronology for the carvings, transforming our understanding of their evolution. The post Rethinking Pictish symbols appeared first on Current Archaeology.
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06-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Dental health and poverty during the Great Irish Famine


A new study analysing the teeth of adults who died in the Kilkenny Union Workhouse at the height of the Great Famine (1845-1852) has revealed some of the possible social reasons for their poor oral health, and how this may have affected their…
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06-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Roman fort settlement revealed in Cumbria


The remains of a settlement associated with the Roman fort of Bravoniacum has been unearthed near Kirkby Thore in Cumbria. The footprints of post-built structures were discovered by GUARD Archaeology Ltd, working with Highways England and Amey…
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06-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Vicus discovered in Devon?


At the opposite end of the country to the Cumbrian settlement described above, signs of another possible extramural fort settlement have been identified at Okehampton, in Devon. Working during housing development, AC Archaeology has discovered the…
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06-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Lamprey for dinner in medieval London


King Henry I is said to have died from eating a ‘surfeit of lampreys’, but there is no excess of these eel-like fish in the archaeological record, as their remains rarely survive. Indeed, traces of lampreys are so scarce that they had previously…
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06-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Science Notes – Hidden in the soil: assessing the chemical composition of graves


In the early days of archaeology, human remains were often treated as an afterthought, deemed unable to tell us much about past populations. As we are well aware today, though, this could not be further from the truth, and in more recent decades the…
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06-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Digging Bronze Age Drumnadrochit


Bronze age cists were discovered in the Kilmore area of the village in 2015 and 2017, and excavation this year has once again shown how rich the region’s prehistoric landscape is, with a third example found during an investigation ahead of a new…
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06-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Current Archaeology 346 – now on sale


Between the end of the Roman occupation of Britain and the Norman Conquest, England changed beyond recognition. Rival Anglo-Saxon kingdoms vied for primacy, but also produced objects of astonishing artistry including, after Christianity returned to…
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01-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Archaeologist of the Year 2019 – Nominees


Who deserves special recognition for their work, research, and dedication to archaeology? Below are the three nominees. Once you’ve made your choice, click here to cast your vote! Voting closes on 11 February 2019, and all the winners of the 2019…
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01-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Research Project of the Year 2019 – Nominees


This has been another exceptional year for archaeological research. Below are all the nominees in this category. Once you’ve made your choice, click here to cast your vote! Voting closes on 11 February 2019, and all the winners of the 2019 Current…
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01-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Rescue Project of the Year 2019 – Nominees


Rescue archaeology is carried out in areas threatened by human or natural agencies. Below are all the nominees in this category. Once you’ve made your choice, click here to cast your vote! Voting closes on 11 February 2019, and the winners of the…
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01-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Book of the Year 2019 – Nominees


Many excellent books have been featured in CA this year. Below are all the nominees in this category. Once you’ve made your choice, click here to cast your vote! Voting closes on 11 February 2019, and all the winners of the 2019 Current Archaeology…
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01-12-2018
Current Archaeology

A shot at conservation: Using the latest technology to save the Mary Rose’s cannonballs


The arsenal of iron shot that was carried aboard Henry VIII’s flagship, the Mary Rose, may have once struck fear into the hearts of those manning the 16th-century French fleet, but today they are somewhat more delicate. Without the right…
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01-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Solving a silver jigsaw: A new hoard of Roman hacksilver from Fife


Recently discovered in Fife, the Dairsie Hoard represents the earliest-known evidence found outside the empire for Roman use of hacksilver to secure their frontiers. Fraser Hunter unpicks its illuminating and ornate contents. The post Solving a…
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01-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Denarii diplomacy: Exploring Scotland’s silver age


Silver was introduced to the inhabitants of Iron Age Scotland by the Roman army. An exhibition currently running in Edinburgh reveals the impact of this exotic material throughout the 1st millennium AD – as Alice Blackwell explains. The post Denarii…
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01-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Ebbsfleet, 54 BC: Searching for the launch site of Caesar’s British invasions


Julius Caesar first invaded Britain on 23 August 55 BC. Within a month, he was gone, and although his army – fewer than 10,000 strong – did not campaign beyond east Kent, the invasion caused a sensation back home. By crossing the sea, Caesar had…
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01-12-2018
Current Archaeology

Resurrecting the Reno: Unearthing the soul of a boundary-pushing Manchester club


Why bother recording archaeological sites from the very recent past? Mike Nevell and Sarah Cattell explain why a community project investigating the remains of a Manchester nightclub demolished in 1986 holds the answer. The post Resurrecting the…
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01-12-2018
Current Archaeology

London Mithraeum: Reimagining the famous Roman temple


On 14 November, London’s Temple of Mithras – now known as the ‘London Mithraeum’ – reopened to the public as the first new interpretation of a Roman ruin in the capital for nearly 20 years. Sophie Jackson, the lead archaeologist on the project,…
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