News source
06-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

Models Explore Possible Causes of Neanderthal Extinction


EINDHOVEN, THE NETHERLANDS—According to a report in The Guardian, a population study conducted by Krist Vaesen of Eindhoven University of Technology and his colleagues suggests the arrival of modern humans in Europe may not have triggered the demise…
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06-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

Study Suggests Roman Britons Suffered from Toxic Lead Levels


MADISON, WISCONSIN—Chemistry World reports that environmental health scientist Sean Scott of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his colleagues analyzed the amount of lead in bones recovered from three cemeteries in Britain’s Roman settlement of…
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06-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

German Ship Sunk During World War I Discovered


PORT STEPHENS, FALKLAND ISLANDS—BBC News reports that the wreckage of the SMS Scharnhorst, an Imperial German Navy armored cruiser, has been found under more than 5,000 feet of water near the Falkland Islands by a team of researchers including…
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06-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

Iron Age Amulet from Egypt Unearthed in Oman


MUSCAT, OMAN—The Times of Oman reports that an Egyptian Eye of Horus amulet has been discovered at an archaeological site near the northern tip of the eastern Arabian Peninsula on the Gulf of Oman by a team of researchers from Oman’s Ministry of…
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06-12-2019
Archaeology Orkney

Nine Possible Bronze Age Figurines Unearthed at Substation Excavation in Orkney?


A team from ORCA Archaeology has discovered an amazing series of half-metre tall stone-carved objects while completing exploratory archaeological excavations connected with the development of an electrical substation on behalf of SSEN Transmission…
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06-12-2019
Current Archaeology

New discoveries in Sutton Park


A number of previously unrecorded archaeological features, spanning prehistory to the present day, have been identified in Birmingham’s Sutton Park. The post New discoveries in Sutton Park appeared first on Current Archaeology.
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05-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

Tests Suggest Ancient Romans Imported Wood from France


ROME, ITALY—According to an Inside Science report, analysis of planks discovered in the waterlogged foundation of an ancient villa unearthed near the Tiber River in central Rome indicates that the wood was imported from France. Dendrochronologist…
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05-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

16th-Century Manuscript Attributed to Queen Elizabeth I


NORWICH, ENGLAND—A manuscript in Lambeth Palace Library has been identified as a work produced by Queen Elizabeth I, according to an announcement released by the University of East Anglia. Researcher John-Mark Philo was looking for translations of…
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05-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

Silk Fabrics Detected in Neolithic Burial in Central China


ZHENGZHOU, CHINA—Xinhua reports that researchers led by Zhao Feng of the China National Silk Museum developed a technique called enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect the presence of silk in carbonized residue in a burial at the…
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05-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

Artifact


What is it? Drinking vessels Species European Bronze and Iron Ages Date 1200–450 B.C. Material Ceramic Found Dietfurt and Augsburg-Haunstetten, Germany Dimensions From 2 to 4 inches wide…
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05-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

CAMBODIA


CAMBODIA: Workers searching through a pile of debris for fallen roof stones from the Ta Nei Temple in Angkor unexpectedly unearthed the head of an ancient bodhisattva statue. The sculpture, which is around 2 feet tall and dates to the late 12th or…
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05-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

SRI LANKA


SRI LANKA: It was much harder for early humans to fashion small, delicate stone tools such as arrowheads than it was to make large, substantial ones like axes. Yet, by around 45,000 years ago, a community living in the rain forests of Sri Lanka had…
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05-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES


UNITED ARAB EMIRATES: A wealth of biological material from two islands in the Persian Gulf demonstrates how well Neolithic communities exploited marine resources. For example, thousands of fish bones from the islands of Marawah and Dalma indicate…
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05-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

IRAQ


IRAQ: Assyrian astronomers gazing at the sky almost 2,700 years ago were the first people to document the colorful cosmic phenomena known as auroras. These light shows, known in the Northern Hemisphere as the northern lights, appear when waves of…
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05-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

RUSSIA


RUSSIA: Between the 14th and 18th centuries, the Black Death killed as much as 60 percent of Europe’s population. The bacterium that caused the plague has now been traced to the town of Laishevo, near the Volga River. Scientists reconstructed the…
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05-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

GREECE


GREECE: In 1802, the ship Mentor was sailing to England when it sank off the island of Kythira. Seventeen boxes of ancient treasures, including the famous Parthenon Marbles, went down to the seafloor. Most of the precious objects were quickly raised…
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05-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

ENGLAND


ENGLAND: Parts of a Shakespeare-era theater were unearthed under London’s Whitechapel neighborhood. The Boar’s Head Playhouse is known from historical documents, but its ruins were brought to light for the first time during a recent construction…
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05-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

SCOTLAND


SCOTLAND: In the 18th and early 19th centuries, a well-traveled drover’s road made the Wilkhouse Inn near Brora a hive of activity. Archaeologists have uncovered a trove of objects, including glass fragments, coins, and personal items left behind by…
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05-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

CHILE


CHILE: The enormous carved heads known as moai are the most recognizable monuments created by the Polynesian civilization that settled Rapa Nui (Easter Island) around A.D. 1000. It turns out the sculptures were also instrumental in boosting…
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05-12-2019
Archaeological Institute America

SOUTH CAROLINA


SOUTH CAROLINA: After the Confederate submarine Hunley attacked USS Housatonic in 1864, the sub sank mysteriously, killing all eight of its crew. Experts have long wondered why the vessel went down, and some now believe it may have been due to a…
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